Curbing my online news addition

While it’s good to be informed of goings on around our nation and the world, too much news consumption becomes a time drain.

I’m a news junkie. I often spend hours each day reading The New York Times, Axios, and The Guardian. My favorite subjects include politics, business, and technology. With news apps at hand, I’m more easily able to keep up with the news. I can turn portrait orientation lock on and fall asleep while scrolling The Times. And, of course, notifications lure me back in when I step away (or doze off).

I feel that most of us have some form of app or internet addiction these days, or have in the past. For some it’s social media that keeps them glued to their devices; for me it’s news. This is a habit I’ve been trying to break.

We know that too much of a good thing can be bad. While it’s good to be informed of goings on around our nation and the world, too much news consumption becomes a time drain. It also leads to stress. Let’s face it, there’s been a lot going on over the past year, and the near constant reading of the news, can have a negative impact on our mental health.

I started to break this habit by turning news notifications off on my phone. I’ve been reading Axios more frequently because their short-form news stories allow me to quickly get the news I need to know and then move on.

As a result, over the past few weeks, I’ve been reading more books on business, sociology, and other nonfiction subjects. While news allows me to be informed of goings on in the moment, books allow me to gain knowledge and improve my life in ways news can’t.


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